It’s Deja VUE All Over Again

While touring the 2 models at the wonderful Vue Unveiling event last week, I couldn’t help but notice a few things about the building that surprised me a bit. This led me to search this weekend for photos of what the VUE in Orlando had done to see if they had these same features.  After a mostly fruitless hour of searching, I literally stumbled upon a couple of newscasts on You Tube of the Vue at Lake Eola’s Grand Opening. This discovery was pure coincidence. Every time I go to research the VUE for one thing I seem to find something else.

We went down this road once before talking about the auctioning of 164 units at the Vue in Orlando because many buyers didn’t close, and it was a trying time and caused lots of angst all around. So let me preface this again by saying the Developers involved (one is not in any way connected to the other) are irrelevant to the subject matter here. The fact is that we have 2 buildings, in 2 cities, that were designed to decently similar overall specs and targeting decently similar demographic markets; were designed to have the same luxury, to make the same statement in their locales (many stories tall, impressive, floor-to-ceiling glass), designed to feature the similar eye-popping amenities, and both constructed in the midst of an economic downturn. You could make the argument that the markets are totally different, and that one may totally succeed and the other may not because of these markets, and I will grant you that. But when I watched the 2 brief newscasts below, I sensed I was experiencing Deja VUE.

One more:

Is there anything different from these videos that we didn’t experience last Thursday? Didn’t many of us think the building was awesome; that we couldn’t wait to live there; that this was most everything we hoped it would be? I won’t speak for you, but I will speak for me. I was euphoric. I walked away from that night and said I absolutely need to find a way to move into the VUE. And, believe it or not, I still feel that way even having watched the newscasts above.

But that is my emotional side. My rational side is telling me that this investment is fraught with risk, and while the obstacles to closing may seem insurmountable, my emotional side is saying please give it a try… see what you can do to overcome the challenges. You committed to this; you want this; try to make this investment work.

I think one of the first steps to help me to make a “yes, I’ll follow-through and close” decision is to hear from the VUE dwellers at Lake Eola that moved in (at the pre-sales prices, not the ones moving it at a presumably huge discount). We have the forum to do that on Facebook. Both the VUE Charlotte and the Vue Lake Eola have Facebook pages.  Wouldn’t you feel better if you heard that the pre-sales folks who moved in are in it for the long haul, are enjoying the heck out of their building; aren’t experiencing any HOA problems or other challenges due to the economic downturn and the auctioned off units, haven’t experienced severe financial losses; and in summary, have no regrets that they closed on their unit?  Wouldn’t that help your state of mind? It would certainly help mine.

Again, I know this is contentious, especially to the Developer who rightfully states that he has no connection with Orlando. But like it or not, the buyers, in my humble opinion, do.  And we, I think it is fair to say, without taking any action, are staring at a highly probable similar fate. So my point today to all readers is this: what can be learned from the pre-sales buyers in Orlando that can be put in place in our contracts so that when we close on our units we don’t experience Deja VUE?

Please comment or send private feedback to vuebuyer10@yahoo.com. I hope the Facebook Homebuyer’s forum feels the same way that I do, which is that the more informed we are the better decisions we will make. If they do decide to reach out to the folks in Orlando, I hope Orlando comes back with positive news!

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